Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Cbeebies Edition

It’s time for another exciting edition of Super Snappy Speed Reviews. This week, I’m focusing exclusively on children’s TV from the Cbeebies channel, so roll up, parents of toddlers, as I review this small selection of my own little girl’s favourite TV shows.

You all know how these things work by now. I’ve selected five random children’s shows from the Cbeebies channel and written tiny little reviews of each of them. As ever these reviews reflect nothing more than my own personal opinions and impressions, squished, squeezed and diminished into just a few short sentences. The shows I have selected have nothing in common, save the fact that they are all fictional stories for very young children and are all found on Cbeebies. They are not necessarily TV shows that I or my daughter particularly liked or disliked, nor are they sorted into any particular order. So, here we go.

Raa Raa The Noisey Lion

A young lion has fun playing with other animals (including some who really ought to be his natural prey) in the Jingly Jangley Jungle. In the first series the show’s format is a little ill-defined, but by series 3 this insufferably self-absorbed little lion hears a different sound which he goes off to investigate and learns an important lesson along the way. Not bad, I suppose but I find the protagonist a bit of a pain (and I suspect his animal friends do too).

⭐⭐⭐

Postman Pat: Special Delivery Service

Postman Pat sure has evolved since my day. There’s a lot more excitement as Pat races against a ticking clock and insurmountable odds to deliver a particular item to the right place. Even as a grown-up, I do find it mildly entertaining and my daughter loves it. A firm favourite of both myself and my daughter.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Woolly and Tig

Right from the heart of my native Glasgow, Woolly and Tig follows the every day adventures of a little girl called Tig and her toy spider, Woolly, who occasionally springs to life to impart some pearl of wisdom whenever Tig encounters something new or confusing. This show has a cheap and cheerful feel to it but is nice to watch all the same. Another firm favourite of my daughter.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

The Twirlywoos

At first glance, this is a bizarre little program about a family of faintly bird-like creatures who live on a boat under the benevolent dictatorship of the faceless ‘hooter.’ Every now and again their boat will land and the hooter will send the Twirlywoos off into the real world to learn some new concept. Apart from being a little strange on the surface, it’s actually pretty good for teaching young kids some very basic concepts. My own daughter is a bit too old for it now and hasn’t really watched it for a good year or two but she loved it when she was still very little.

And in a weird way… so did I.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

Bitz and Bob

Ah yes, my daughter’s latest obsession. Bitz and Bob is about a girl and her little brother playing imaginative games with their toys and using science to solve problems. Entertaining and educational (though I don’t understand why Bob’s robot costume is the only ‘toy’ that doesn’t function in their imaginative games; it’s almost like Bitz has a pathological need to be the hero every single time). However, be warned, gentle parents: the music may drive adults to drink.

⭐⭐⭐

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT ALL THE PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF SUPER SNAPPY SPEED REVIEWS
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (Vol. 4)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition (Vol. 3)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (Vol. 4)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (Vol. 2)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Doctor Who EditionSuper Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Books Edition (vol 1)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition (vol. 2)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Writing Apps for Android
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (vol. 3)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Games Edition
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Star Trek EditionSuper Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (vol. 2)
8 Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Film5 Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition
8 Super Snappy Speed Reviews

Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you enjoyed it, don’t forget to ‘like’ this post and also follow us so you never miss another post. You can also follow Penstricken on TwitterPinterest and like Penstricken on Facebook.

Want a blog of your own? Start writing today with WordPress.com!

WordPress.com Jetpack WooCommerce

ATTENTION AUTHORS:

Every Tuesday, I post a new edition of Spotlight: a short post which shines a proverbial spotlight on a published novel or collection of short fiction. If you would like to have your book considered for a future edition of Spotlightdrop us an e-mail including a short synopsis of your book and a link to where we can buy it. Better yet, send me a copy of your book and I can include a mini-review.

I’m still looking to interview fiction authors here on Penstricken, especially new or indie authors. Whether it’s books, plays, comics or any other kind of fiction, if you’ve got something written, I want to hear about it. If you’re interested in having your work featured on Penstricken, be to sure to drop us an e-mail or message us on Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest.

Please be advised that due to a recent surge in interest, I am presently committed to a significant number of reviews/interviews over the next couple of months. If you would like an interview or review, I would still love to hear from you, though it is unlikely that I will be able to begin work immediately.

You can check out our previous interviews here:

Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (Vol. 4)

Spoiler Alert

Anyone who has not read The Golden Egg by Maggie Keen, Peedie Puffin by Michelle Robertson, The Jolly Pocket Postman by Janet & Allan Ahlberg, Tractor in Trouble by Heather Amery or Postman Pat and the Giant Snowball by Alison Ritchie is hereby advised that this post may contain a few unavoidable spoilers.

It’s time once more for another exciting edition of Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition! My daughter is almost three now and more addicted to books than ever before, especially picture books with simple stories, and so I’ve reviewed another small selection from her bookshelf for your enjoyment.

You all know how these things work by now. I’ve selected five random children’s books and written tiny little reviews on each of them. As ever these reviews reflect nothing more than my own personal opinions and impressions, abridged, abbreviated and condensed into just a few short sentences. The books I have selected have nothing in common, save the fact that they are all fictional stories for very young children. They are not necessarily books that I or my daughter particularly liked or disliked, nor are they sorted into any particular order. So, here we go.

The Golden Egg by Maggie Keen

This sweet little tale of a duck who longs to find an egg made of solid gold (for some reason) has been one of my daughter’s favourites on and off since she got it. I quite like it too. The protagonists have a clear goal which they try to accomplish only to gain a profound epiphany in the end. Highly accessible to small children and with a beautifully paced rhyming pattern.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

Peedie Puffin by Michelle Robertson

A sweet but fairly unremarkable tale about a puffin who decides to go and live apart from other puffins and then changes his mind and goes home. Highly accessible for toddlers but a bit of a bore.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟

The Jolly Pocket Postman by Janet & Allan Ahlberg

If you’re running out of psychoactive drugs during lockdown*, try reading this instead. This story follows the bizarre adventures of a postman who gets caught up in a surreal mish-mash of fairy-tales. The swift rhyming pattern creates a sense of urgency, stressing out both adult and child alike as they try to make sense of what the heck is going on.

*Don’t do drugs, kids.

My rating: 🌟

Tractor in Trouble by Heather Amery

This book is flavour of the month with my almost-three year old right now. Personally I found it a bit of a bore at first but I’m warming up to it and I can see how its simple but inoffensive plot would appeal to a toddler. My only real criticism is about Mrs Boot, the farmer. She is introduced on the first page and then… she never does anything again. Even when Ted needs a farmer’s help, he calls for Farmer Dray instead of Mrs Boot. I mean…. why?

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

Postman Pat and the Giant Snowball by Alison Ritchie

This has been a firm favourite of both myself and my daughter since the day she first encountered it. Postman Pat and the Giant Snowball (or ‘The Snowy One’ as my daughter used to call it) is based on the TV episode of the same name. You can’t go wrong with Postman Pat and this book has been lovingly adapted from screen into clear and simple prose in a way which feels natural and remains highly accessible regardless of whether or not your child has seen the TV show.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT ALL THE PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF SUPER SNAPPY SPEED REVIEWS
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition (Vol. 3)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (Vol. 4)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (Vol. 2)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Doctor Who Edition
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Books Edition (vol 1)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition (vol. 2)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Writing Apps for AndroidSuper Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (vol. 3)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Games EditionSuper Snappy Speed Reviews: Star Trek Edition
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (vol. 2)8 Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Film
5 Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition8 Super Snappy Speed Reviews

Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you enjoyed it, don’t forget to ‘like’ this post and also follow us so you never miss another post. You can also follow Penstricken on TwitterPinterest and like Penstricken on Facebook.

Want a blog of your own? Start writing today with WordPress.com!

WordPress.com Jetpack WooCommerce

ATTENTION AUTHORS:

Every Tuesday, I post a new edition of Spotlight: a short post which shines a proverbial spotlight on a published novel or collection of short fiction. If you would like to have your book considered for a future edition of Spotlightdrop us an e-mail including a short synopsis of your book and a link to where we can buy it. Better yet, send me a copy of your book and I can include a mini-review.

I’m still looking to interview fiction authors here on Penstricken, especially new or indie authors. Whether it’s books, plays, comics or any other kind of fiction, if you’ve got something written, I want to hear about it. If you’re interested in having your work featured on Penstricken, be to sure to drop us an e-mail or message us on Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest.

Please be advised that due to a recent surge in interest, I am presently committed to a significant number of reviews/interviews over the next couple of months. If you would like an interview or review, I would still love to hear from you, though it is unlikely that I will be able to begin work immediately.

You can check out our previous interviews here:

Why I Love Julia Donaldson’s Picture Books

If you read books to your children (and you should), there’s a more than even chance you will have come across the work of Julia Donaldson. If you haven’t, allow me to commend her to you now. Donaldson is the author of numerous award winning picture books, including (but not limited to) The Gruffalo, Room on the Broom, Monkey Puzzle and The Smartest Giant in Town.

Before I became a parent myself, it never occurred to me that a two year old could have a favourite author. I was wrong. Whether or not my two year old understands that there is a common author behind her favourite works or not, I cannot say. One thing I do know is that the vast majority of the books she asks my wife and I to read to her over and over were penned by Julia Donaldson.

A remarkable coincidence! I hear you cry. But no, for I can also say with certainty that of all the books I read to my daughter, Julia Donaldson’s picture books are the ones that I also enjoy the most.

So what makes her work stand head and shoulders above the rest?

Perhaps one of the things I like most about her books is the non-patronising language she uses. Although it is crafted in a way which is highly accessible for small children, the quality of writing suggests a (very correct) presupposition that children are intelligent and capable of learning, rather than stupid and in need simplistic sentences and single syllable words. As a result, the word choice and sentence structure in her picture books is often not so different to what you might find in a book aimed at a much older audience, were it not for the use of repetition and rhyme which make the writing more accessible for younger audiences.

In a similar way, the stories themselves are far more tightly structured than I have found in picture books by other authors. Many non-Donaldson picture books I’ve come across either read like some strange literary acid trip (I hate these) or else have a meandering quality to them, with little or no conflict for the protagonist to overcome. For instance, Eric Hill’s Spot books follow the adventures of a puppy called Spot who does perfectly normal things, like going to library where he reads some books and brings a few home. Now there’s nothing wrong with that in a picture book (my daughter loves Spot too!), however Donaldson’s books actually employ the conventions found in more adult writing, such as giving characters motives, goals, conflicts and resolutions. This not only makes the story more enjoyable for the parent reading it, but also allows the child to experience a story with a bit of substance to it and, as a consequence, to learn a thing or two about life.

For instance, one of my daughter’s favourites is Tabby McTat, in a which a busker’s cat is accidentally separated from his master. The cat builds a new life for himself, settles down with new owners and has a family but is continually plagued by the memory of his old master until he finally goes hunting for him. Upon finding him, he is torn between returning to his old master and remaining with his new family. There is also a subplot about the youngest son of McTat’s litter who enjoys singing loudly and out of tune to such an extent that he is unable to find an owner. These conflicts are also resolved with a neat little bow at the end of the story, just like you would expect to find in any quality piece of writing.

My daughter loves this book, and will often comment not only on the central themes of the story, but will also ask us about other interesting concepts the book has introduced her to, such as busking, thieving, hospitals and family. In a similar way, whenever we read The Highway Rat, which tells the story of a highway robber, she frequently will interrupt us to ask who the stolen property belongs to; and when we tell her that it really belongs to the character the rat stole it from, my daughter will arrive at the conclusion that the rat shouldn’t have taken it. Again, when we read The Gruffalo’s Child, my daughter will explain to us that the Gruffalo’s Child really should have stayed at home, and when we get to the bit where the Gruffalo’s Child says she isn’t scared, my daughter will pipe up: ‘I think she probably is scared!’

In short, she is learning and loving it.

I suspect we often patronise our children with meaningless stories. I do believe there is an important place for low/zero conflict picture books in the world of children’s fiction so I certainly don’t mean to knock any other books or authors (except for the aforementioned acid-trip writers; you can get out of my house), but I feel that Donaldson and authors like her provide a very special service to children by giving them access to stories which will give them the experience of a character with a goal they cannot easily accomplish. If such things are wholesome for adult consumption, surely they are also beneficial to a child (provided, of course, that language and themes are age appropriate).

As for me, I can think of no better compliment for a children’s author than to say that her writing both teaches and pleases my daughter; and that is exactly what Julia Donaldson has accomplished time and time again.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you enjoyed it, don’t forget to ‘like’ this post and also follow us so you never miss another post. You can also follow Penstricken on TwitterPinterest and like Penstricken on Facebook.

Want a blog of your own? Start writing today with WordPress.com!

WordPress.com Jetpack WooCommerce

ATTENTION AUTHORS:

Every Tuesday, I post a new edition of Spotlight: a short post which shines a proverbial spotlight on a published novel or collection of short fiction. If you would like to have your book considered for a future edition of Spotlightdrop us an e-mail including a short synopsis of your book and a link to where we can buy it. Better yet, send me a copy of your book and I can include a mini-review.

I’m still looking to interview fiction authors here on Penstricken, especially new or indie authors. Whether it’s books, plays, comics or any other kind of fiction, if you’ve got something written, I want to hear about it. If you’re interested in having your work featured on Penstricken, be to sure to drop us an e-mail or message us on Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest.

Please be advised that due to a recent surge in interest, I am presently committed to a significant number of reviews/interviews over the next couple of months. If you would like an interview or review, I would still love to hear from you, though it is unlikely that I will be able to begin work immediately.

You can check out our previous interviews here:

Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (Vol. 3)

SPOILER ALERT

Anyone who has not read Loving Comfort by Julie Dillemuth, Tiddler: The Story-Telling Fish by Julia Donaldson, Postman Pat: The Secret by John Cunliffe, Charlie Crow in the Snow by Paula Metcalf or Nicola Baxter’s version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Ladybird Picture Books) is hereby advised that this post may contain a few unavoidable spoilers.

My daughter has been into books ever since she was a baby. Now, being just shy of two and a half years old, she’s more story daft than ever before and so I thought it was time for yet another exciting instalment of Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (you can check out al the previous editions at the bottom of this post).

You know the drill by now. These reviews reflect nothing but my own personal opinions and impressions, reduced, flattened and shrink-rayed into a few short sentences. The books I have selected have nothing in common, save the fact that they are all fictional stories for very young children. They are not necessarily books I particularly liked or disliked, nor are they sorted into any particular order. So, here we go.

Loving Comfort by Julie Dillemuth

This little book is aimed particularly at young toddlers who about to take that difficult step towards being fully weaned. It tells the story of baby Jack and how, with the help of his parents, he eventually managed to stop nursing when the time came for him to do so.

If you’re not American, you might find some of the language a little foreign (my daughter calls her grandfather papa, not me) but it’s a well written story which my daughter appears to understand. She certainly enjoys it.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

Tiddler: The Story-Telling Fish by Julia Donaldson

When it comes to writing books for toddlers, Julia Donaldson can do no wrong. I’ll be honest and say that I don’t think Tiddler quite reaches the lofty standards of The Gruffalo or Monkey Puzzle (at least, my daughter doesn’t ask for it quite as often) but still a very solid offering from the author who seems to write all my daughter’s favourite books. No toddler’s bookshelf should be without it.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

Postman Pat: The Secret by John Cunliffe

My daughter is a huge Postman Pat fan. This book was first published way back in 1982 and is based on a particular episode of the original TV series, in which the friendly Yorkshire postman Pat Clifton is surprised to discover that everybody in the village has learned his secret: that today is his birthday.

Personally, I find the book a bit of a drag to read when compared to some of my daughter’s other books and, in true classic Postman Pat style, the story is very genteel even for a toddler’s book, but my daughter seems quite taken with it.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟

Charlie Crow in the Snow by Paula Metcalf

This book is one of my daughter’s hot favourites right now. Personally, there’s something about it I find a little jarring, though I can’t quite put my finger on it. It’s a perfectly cute little story about a crow and his animal friends facing winter for the first time (presumably).

If I’m being clinical and analytical, I can find nothing wrong with this book. It’s sweet, educational, and my daughter loves it. It just doesn’t quite ring my bell, but then I don’t suppose it’s aimed at me.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟

Goldilocks and the Three Bears by Nicola Baxter

It’s really difficult to pick just one version of this classic folk tale, so I went for Nicola Baxter’s version published by Ladybird Books (1999) because it is, hands down, my daughter’s favourite. The repeated contrast between Father Bear’s big things, Mother Bear’s medium sized things and Baby Bear’s tiny little things is a particular source of entertainment to my daughter, who enjoys trying to impersonate the booming voice I use for Father Bear and the squeaky one I use for Baby Bear.

Goldilocks was never my favourite folk tale, not even as a child, but I really enjoy this version of it and so does my wee girl.

My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT ALL THE PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF SUPER SNAPPY SPEED REVIEWS
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (Vol. 4)Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Edition (Vol. 2)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Doctor Who Edition Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Children’s Books Edition (vol 1)
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition (vol. 2) Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Writing Apps for Android
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (vol. 3) Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Games Edition
Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Star Trek Edition Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Books (vol. 2)
8 Super Snappy Speed Reviews: Film 5 Super Snappy Speed Reviews: TV Edition
8 Super Snappy Speed Reviews

Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you enjoyed it, don’t forget to ‘like’ this post and also follow us so you never miss another post. You can also follow Penstricken on TwitterPinterest and like Penstricken on Facebook, if that’s what eats your porridge.

Want a blog of your own? Start writing today with WordPress.com!

WordPress.com Jetpack WooCommerce

ATTENTION AUTHORS:

I’m still looking to interview fiction authors here on Penstricken, especially new or indie authors. Whether it’s books, plays, comics or any other kind of fiction, if you’ve got something written, I want to hear about it. If you’re interested in having your work featured on Penstricken, be to sure to drop us an e-mail or message us on Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest.

You can check out our previous interviews here: